“Quiky” the Nesquik Bunny

Nesquik Rabbit— Having already considered the Trix Rabbit, it is only fair that we also consider the Nesquik Bunny, wondering perhaps which one might win in a Deadliest Warrior deathmatch…

…now Nesquik is a milk flavoring mix developed in the U.S. in 1948, and introduced there as Nestle Quik. The name was changed to the worldwide brand Nesquik in 1999.  In 1973, the Quik Bunny, an anthropomorphic rabbit, was introduced as the product mascot, originally sporting a large red “Q” on him which was changed to an “N” in 1998 when the brand name changed.  The nickname of said rabbit is Quiky, and he has endured as the product mascot for over 35 years.

I guess I somewhat prefer the Trix Rabbit as he is slightly pitiful and pathetic, seldom getting the cereal that he yearns for whereas the Quik Bunny always gets his chocolate milk fix.  Quiky seems to be somewhat more metaphysical, lately urging consumers to “come to your happy place.” –and just where might that be, hmmm?    😉

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14 Comments on ““Quiky” the Nesquik Bunny”

  1. Carycomic Says:

    Not in a briar patch, I’s thinkin’!

  2. Carycomic Says:

    For those of you under 18? Walt Disney Studios used to have this movie called “Song of the South,” based partially on folktales credited to one Uncle Remus. These folktales were derived from trickster-myths about the East African hare. The latter was ultimately Americanized by black slaves in the antebellum South as “Br(oth)er Rabbit.”

    And, the animated segments of this Disney cult-classic depicted at least three of those tales. One of them involving Br’er Rabbit’s “happy place.” His briar patch.

    Unfortunately, “Song of the South” will probably never be released on DVD, telecast on TV, or re-released to theaters, ever again. Because, Spike Lee and other p.c. addicts regard the 19th-century Southern drawl, dramatized by the African-American actors in the film, as racist!

    • vulpesffb Says:

      I LOVED “Song of the South,” but also doubt that we’ll ever see it released in public again…too politically incorrect, tsk tsk!

      The “Old South” stuff didn’t bother me; that was then, this is now. I was, however, offended by the way that Br’er Fox was portrayed…

  3. Carycomic Says:

    Hollywood had to clean it up, somehow. The original stories, in book form, had his arch-enemy as Br’er Wolf! And, defaming the feeding habits of C. lupus is even more politically incorrect, these last 40 years!!

  4. Carycomic Says:

    P.S.—Another reason I miss that movie. I loved the legendary aopening number “Zippity-Doo-Dah.” And, the lesser-known classic that goes:

    “Fooooooxsylvania, where the wind goes sweepin’ down the plain.”

    • vulpesffb Says:

      The South shall rise again faster than “Song of the South.”–But hey, tell me a story, Uncle Remus!

      (observes pickets protesting Aunt Jemina and Uncle Ben while getting stuck on a tar baby…)

  5. Carycomic Says:

    Speaking of musicals; did you ever see the movie version of MAME, starring Lucille Ball? I loved the scene where she falls off the horse, and the fox comes right over to her (seemingly in sympathy) and submits to a vigorous doggie-style rub-down.

    What a well-trained little actor it was!

    • vulpesffb Says:

      I’d submit to a vigorous rub-down, but no one gives me a chance!–Respect, I tell ‘ya, I just don’t get no respect at all! (pulls on red tie)

  6. Carycomic Says:

    Funny! I don’t recall John Elroy Sanford ever wearing a red tie.*

    *Hint! Check IMDB ;-D

    • vulpesffb Says:

      Well, I was thinkin’ Rodney Dangerfield here, who at one time was depicted as a canine in a cartoon…

  7. Carycomic Says:

    Lol! I know. That film was entitled ROVER DANGERFIELD. But, the late, great star of SANFORD AND SON had a stage name that was just too good to resist.

  8. Carycomic Says:

    “I’m talkin’ about Redd Foxx, you big dummies!”

  9. Carycomic Says:

    Nyuk-nyuk-Nyuk!

    P.S.—what you would call a movie about a giant stand-up comedian who attacks NYC in revenge for never getting any respect?

    Answer: RODNEY CLOVERFIELD!


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