The Last Dinosaur?

sauropod–A previous post here has looked at Mokele-mbembe, but now MonsterQuest has done a feature as well.  Going into the West African jungle in search of a sauropod-like creature with a long neck and tail and a small head, Mokele-mbembe is a territorial, amphibious creature known to attack humans.  It is active at night, browsing on leaves.

The first written accounts of the creature came from odd claw marks found in the Congo in 1776.  Pygmies are familiar with the beast, but believe that they will surely die if they report it, which puts a bit of a damper on things.

An underwater sonar survey by MonsterQuest found crocodiles, snakes, and “unusual profiles,” some of which were likely tree branches…and the dark and murky waters of the African rivers weren’t conducive to sightings.  The remote location of the investigation and the politically dangerous nature of the area also hampered the search…so once again, MonsterQuest came up empty.

Our imagination or not, humanity needs great mysteries.  This is yet another one of them…

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2 Comments on “The Last Dinosaur?”

  1. Carycomic Says:

    I always get a perverse kick out of these mainstream zoologists when they describe the existence of an alleged cryptid as “highly unlikely.”

    That’s exactly what I say to their belief that “the natives of the region must have misidentified it.”

    LOL!


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